The Glasgow Artwork Of Stephen O’Neil.

I don’t know the South Side of Glasgow. I don’t know the roads or the streets and whenever I go there, I just wander around looking in shop windows and whistling to myself. Yesterday, I was doing just that when my whistling was stopped dead. Because I saw THIS PAINTING IN A SHOP WINDOW!…

Teacakes  

…So I went in. And then I saw THIS PAINTING!…

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…And THIS ONE!…

Breid

…And THIS!…

Beresford

So much Glesga! Painted beautifully. I lifted a wee card about the artist who painted these, Stephen O’Neil. It had a photo of him on the front and I was reading it when the guy behind the counter in the shop started telling me about the paintings…that he painted.

Funny. I THOUGHT you looked a bit like yourself!”, I said.
And folks, he really does.

I’ve focused on Stephen’s Glasgow images here because I’m daft aboot Glesga but you should see his New York and London work. And you can…
View Stephen’s site HERE.
Twitter and Facebook links HERE and HERE.

I still don’t know my way around the South Side of Glasgow. But at least I now know where this shop is…

Stephen O’Neil Art. 1030 Pollokshaws Road. (Opposite Langside Halls), Glasgow. G41 2HG.

You May Also Be Interested In…
* From Pencil To Paper To Pen To Pencil To Photoshop To Poster * The Glasgow Alphabet By Rosemary Cunningham
* Daniel Fitzpatrick: Portrait Artist

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“The Scottish Hippo” By Alasdair Gray.

Seemingly inspired by “The Hippopotamus” by T.S. Elliot, here is Alasdair Gray‘s poem, “The Scottish Hippo”, and it’s beautiful accompanying illustrations…

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The Scottish Hippo by Alasdair Gray

The muckle hippopotamus
spelders in glaur apo’ his kite.
A solid fact he seems tae some.
They arena right.

The hippo’s coorse digestive tract
erodes through frequent emptying.
The KIRK’s the only solid fact
that winna ding.

In gaitherin o’ warldly gear
the hippo often gangs agley.
The KIRK can hunker on her rear
and draw her pay.

The apples hippo gapes tae pree
are oot the reach o’ sic a brute.
The KIRK’s refreshed frae yont the sea
wi’ juicy fruit.

A hippo, fashed by fleshy thorn,
ejaculates in congress grubby.
The KIRK bel-cantos nicht and morn,
GOD is her hubby.

When cloud o’ mirk obscures creation
the hippo wakes tae hunt its meat.
The KIRK’s suspendit animation
can sleep and eat.

Behold the hippopotamus arise,
clap his broad wings and, soaring,
claim the skies!
Angles sing him in,
saints bring him in
to paradise!

In pure flood
of lamb’s blood
he’s laundered neat.
To gold harp
in f-sharp
he warbles sweet.

Clean o’ stain
amang his ain
each martyred virgin is his jo.
The auld KIRK
in the auld mirk
foozles below.

You May Also Be Interested In…
* Al Cook’s “Necropolis”
* The Glasgow Alphabet By Rosemary Cunningham
* John R. Neill Artwork: “The Sea Fairies” (PART I) & (PART II)

Artist István Orosz & The Hidden Skulls.

Hungarian artist István Orosz has created some new illustrations for “Ship Of Fools“, a medieval book of satire originally published in 1494 in Basel, Switzerland, by Sebastian Brant and as you are about to see, all of the illustrations cleverly ‘conceal’ human skulls…

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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View the full set on István Orosz’ site HERE.

You May Also Be Interested In…
* Cracking Open A Cold One
* Macabre, Weird & Wonderful Childrens’ Book Illustrations By Gōjin Ishihara
* Stop-Motion Animation …On A Vinyl Record!

Gorgeous Portraits Of Movie Characters & Classic Shots.

I’d like to tell you all a little bit about the magnificent paintings of cinematic classics you’re about to see but unfortunately, I know almost nothing.

Here’s what I do know: The artist seems to be called Massimo Carnevale and…that’s it!

The Great Dictator (1940):
The Great Dictator 1940

Some Like It Hot (1959):
Some Like It Hot 1959

The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967):
The Fearless Vampire Killers 1967

Serpico (1973):
Serpico 1973

JAWS (1975):
JAWS 1975

Taxi Driver (1976):
Taxi Driver 1976

Saturday Night Fever (1977):
Saturday Night Fever 1977

Alien !1979):
Alien 1979

The Blues Brothers (1980):
The Blues Brothers 1980

The Elephant Man (1980):
The Elephant Man 1980

The Shining (1980):
The Shining 1980

Back To the Future (1985):
Back To The Future 1985

Brazil (1985):
Brazil 1985

Full Metal Jacket (1987):
Full Metal Jacket 1987

Point Break (1991):
Point Break 1991

The Silence Of The Lambs (1991):
The Silence Of The Lambs 1991

True Romance (1993):
True Romance 1993

The Crow (1994):
The Crow 1994

The Green Mile (1999):
The Green Mile 1999

Death Proof (2007):
Death Proof 2007

Bronson (2007):
Bronson 2007

Gran Torino (2008):
Gran Torino 2008

Machete (2010):
Machete 2010

Django unchained (2012):
Django Unchained 2012

There are a HELLUVA lot more of these wonderful paintings and they can be viewed HERE.
The original artist seems to have a blog HERE.

You May Also Be Interested In…
* Trailer: “Drew: The Man Behind The Poster”
* “Death Proof” – Stuntman Mike’s Mix
* Keep The Meter Running

Rejected Album Artwork: David Bowie’s “The Man Who Sold The World”.

This is how we all know and recognise David Bowie’s album “The Man Who Sold The World”:

Ah, but things could’ve been very different…

The original 1970 US release of “The Man Who Sold The World” employed a cartoon-like cover drawing by Bowie’s friend Michael J. Weller, featuring a cowboy in front of the Cane Hill mental asylum.

The first UK cover, on which Bowie is seen reclining in a Mr Fish “man’s dress”, was an early indication of his interest in exploiting his androgynous appearance. The dress was designed by British fashion designer Michael Fish, and Bowie also used it in February 1971 on his first promotional tour to the United States, where he wore it during interviews despite the fact that the Americans had no knowledge of the as yet unreleased UK cover.

It has been said that his “bleached blond locks, falling below shoulder level”, were inspired by a Pre-Raphaelite painting by Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

The 1971 German release presented a winged hybrid creature with Bowie’s head and a hand for a body, preparing to flick the Earth away.

The 1972 worldwide reissue by RCA Records used a black-and-white picture of Ziggy Stardust on the sleeve which remained until 1990 when the Rykodisc reissue reinstated the original UK “dress” cover. It also appeared on the 1999 EMI remaster.

“Oh By Jingo!” indeed.

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