Photography: Demolition Work Begins On Glasgow’s Gallowgate Twins.

They’ve started pulling down Glesga’s Gallowgate Twins.
Or as they’re never ever referred to by anyone these days, Bluevale & Whitevale Towers.

I noticed when I was out on my morning saunter. Here’s a photie…

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From Wikipedia…

The Bluevale and Whitevale Towers is the name for a development of twin tower block flats situated in the Camlachie district within the East End of Glasgow, Scotland. Officially known as 109 Bluevale Street and 51 Whitevale Street, (often nicknamed the Gallowgate Twins or the ‘Camlachie Twin Towers) the two towers stand as the tallest building in Scotland, although with only 29 occupiable floors (the 30th floor is a mechanical floor for building services and a drying area), they are not the buildings with the highest occupied floor level in the city (or Scotland) – this distinction belongs to the contemporary Red Road estate on the north side of the city. They became Scotland’s second tallest free-standing structure in Scotland following the demolition of Inverkip Power Station on the Firth of Clyde in 2013.

History

Faced with crippling housing shortages in the immediate post-war period, the city undertook the building of multi-storey housing in tower blocks in the 1960’s and early 1970’s on a grand scale, which led to Glasgow becoming the first truly high-rise city in Britain. However, many of these “schemes”, as they are known, were poorly planned, or badly designed and cheaply constructed, which led to many of the blocks becoming insanitary magnets for crime and deprivation. It would not be until 1988 that high rises were built in the city once again, with the construction of the 17-storey Forum Hotel next to the SECC. The 20-storey Hilton Hotel in Anderston followed in 1992. From the early 1990s, Glasgow City Council and its successor, the Glasgow Housing Association, have run a programme of demolishing the worst of the residential tower blocks, including Basil Spence‘s Gorbals blocks in 1993.

The buildings are also unique in their construction – featuring hydraulic jacks in their foundations to combat sway due to their height.

Future

In November 2011, it was announced by Glasgow Housing Association of the intention to demolish the development, citing the unpopularity of the estate among residents and high maintenance and running costs. The buildings have also suffered structural problems over time. Work to demolish the towers is set to begin after the demolition of the Red Road estate.

Property developers are currently planning several new upmarket residential and office high-rises along the River Clyde, and in the city’s financial district, which will far surpass these in height.

Here’s a short film about The Gallowgate Twins…

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Back Tae The Future. The “Back To The Future” Trilogy…In Glaswegian!

3 days ago it occurred to me to remake the “Back To The Future” Trilogy…in Glaswegian! I do that at home anyway in my head so I decided to do it on Twitter. It’s my density.

Almost 800 followers in 3 days! Not too bad at all.
You can follow HERE.

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* The Godfaither. “The Godfather” Trilogy…In Glaswegian!
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GLASGOW. A Sketch Book By John Nisbet.

“I remembered how you love Glasgow and I always see you doing your drawings, Al…” she’d said as she handed me the small brown A5 book. She’d found it whilst cleaning out her loft.

Anne had given me a book called “Glasgow. A Sketch Book By John Nisbet”.

I gave it a quick glance and thanked her very much. After all, It’s not every day that someone gives you a book of sketches from the 1970’s is it? Except this book wasn’t from the 1970’s at all! I’d just assumed it was! It just looked like a book from the 70’s. Very good condition but…old and…beige, y’know? Anyway, when I got home I properly looked at the book and discovered that it was from 1913! A sketch book of Glasgow from 100 years ago!

A few days later, I did the right thing and sold it on Ebay for a FORTUNE!
The End.

Just kidding. I actually tried to persuade Anne to take the book back. “It might be worth something! It’s a hundred years old!” I told her. But nope, the book was mine so thanks and thanks again Anne!

I remember once hearing that copyright expires after a period of 90 years or so. I do hope that’s true because I have decided to scan and upload each and every page of this wonderful book so that you can all enjoy it!

A lot has changed in Glasgow over the past 100 years and yet, looking at these drawings, Glasgow is still very recognisable…

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You May Also Be Interested In…
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“Midnight, And The Stars And…Who?”

Here’s an interesting little piece of movie trivia from Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining“:

“The 1921 photograph at the end of the film was a genuine 1920’s photo, with Jack Nicholson’s head airbrushed onto the body of another man. Stanley Kubrick originally planned to use extras and shoot the photo himself, but he realized he couldn’t make it look any better than the real thing.”

I’ve always (ALWAYS) known that a real photo was used for the film and I’ve always been fascinated with it and the faces in it for that very reason. As a matter of fact, I even have a framed copy of it in my living room which is always good for creeping visitors out.

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But who was removed from the photograph as Jack Nicholson was airbrushed in and what did he look like? Whose arm and body is that doubling for Ol’ Jacky Boy there?

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Well, so far as I can tell, history doesn’t seem to have recorded his name but here’s the elusive devil right here:

Shining

I’ve spent YEARS trying to track this photo down and it was only recently that I found it on a very informative website dedicated to all things SHINING…

Courtesy of  The Overlook Hotel

The original, unaltered period photo into which actor Jack Nicholson was composited to create the iconic photograph seen in the final shots of The Shining.

These images were found in a book entitled The Complete Airbrush and Photo-Retouching Manual, which was originally published in 1985. The book also identifies the retouching artist responsible for this work, Joan Honour Smith.

The original photographs of Jack Nicholson are located in the Stanley Kubrick Archive in London, and inspection of them reveals that only Nicholson’s head, collar, and bowtie were used; the rest of the figure is the anonymous man in the original 1923 photograph.

Interestingly, close examination of images from the film reveals that two different photo-composites were used: one for the long tracking shot which pushes down the hall towards the photo, and a different one for the extreme close-up. Nicholson’s composited head rotates from one photo to the next, and his shoulder shifts, partially obscuring the woman holding the cigarette behind him.

Retouching

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Al Cook’s “Necropolis”: The Crucifixion.

Awrite n’ that, big man?
Here’s the latest unfunny from my comic-strip, Al Cook’s “Necropolis”.
Share it with your pals if you have any.

Necropolis Header

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View this as it’s meant to be viewed by clicking HERE.
Keep up to date with the twits on Twitter HERE and if you have any hate mail or death threats please ONLY use the Facebook Page which is HERE.

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* Behind A Cook’s “Necropolis”: Nailing Him Up.
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