Photography: Demolition Work Begins On Glasgow’s Gallowgate Twins.

They’ve started pulling down Glesga’s Gallowgate Twins.
Or as they’re never ever referred to by anyone these days, Bluevale & Whitevale Towers.

I noticed when I was out on my morning saunter. Here’s a photie…

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From Wikipedia…

The Bluevale and Whitevale Towers is the name for a development of twin tower block flats situated in the Camlachie district within the East End of Glasgow, Scotland. Officially known as 109 Bluevale Street and 51 Whitevale Street, (often nicknamed the Gallowgate Twins or the ‘Camlachie Twin Towers) the two towers stand as the tallest building in Scotland, although with only 29 occupiable floors (the 30th floor is a mechanical floor for building services and a drying area), they are not the buildings with the highest occupied floor level in the city (or Scotland) – this distinction belongs to the contemporary Red Road estate on the north side of the city. They became Scotland’s second tallest free-standing structure in Scotland following the demolition of Inverkip Power Station on the Firth of Clyde in 2013.

History

Faced with crippling housing shortages in the immediate post-war period, the city undertook the building of multi-storey housing in tower blocks in the 1960’s and early 1970’s on a grand scale, which led to Glasgow becoming the first truly high-rise city in Britain. However, many of these “schemes”, as they are known, were poorly planned, or badly designed and cheaply constructed, which led to many of the blocks becoming insanitary magnets for crime and deprivation. It would not be until 1988 that high rises were built in the city once again, with the construction of the 17-storey Forum Hotel next to the SECC. The 20-storey Hilton Hotel in Anderston followed in 1992. From the early 1990s, Glasgow City Council and its successor, the Glasgow Housing Association, have run a programme of demolishing the worst of the residential tower blocks, including Basil Spence‘s Gorbals blocks in 1993.

The buildings are also unique in their construction – featuring hydraulic jacks in their foundations to combat sway due to their height.

Future

In November 2011, it was announced by Glasgow Housing Association of the intention to demolish the development, citing the unpopularity of the estate among residents and high maintenance and running costs. The buildings have also suffered structural problems over time. Work to demolish the towers is set to begin after the demolition of the Red Road estate.

Property developers are currently planning several new upmarket residential and office high-rises along the River Clyde, and in the city’s financial district, which will far surpass these in height.

Here’s a short film about The Gallowgate Twins…

You May Also Be Interested In…
* Buchanan Street, Glasgow. As Seen From The Roof Of Glasgow Royal Concert Hall
* The Victorian Statues In Glasgow’s George Square
* The Glasgow Alphabet By Rosemary Cunningham

 

Buchanan Street, Glasgow. As Seen From The Roof Of Glasgow Royal Concert Hall.

Glasgow’s always pretty but on this particular day, it was pretty foggy.

Buchanan Street is one of my favourite streets in Glasgow (Despite the fact that it’s full of shops) and like everyone else, I know that it’s best photographed from the top of the steps of The Royal Concert Hall. But there are a couple of problems with photographing Buchanan Street from those steps.

The first problem is that your photos are gonna be similar to the photos of the hundreds of people who take photos from there every day. The second problem is that Glasgow City Council are planning to demolish those steps. But don’t get me started on that because that’s a story for another day.

That day, there was only one thing for it. I had to get access to the roof of the Concert Hall. So that’s what I did…

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As you can see, I’m never gonna win any awards for my lack of photographic skills and I didn’t realise until later that I had an annoying fake ‘Fisheye’ setting turned on whilst I was up there but I hope you like the pictures nonetheless. I don’t like heights but it was great to see Glasgow from up there.

If you’d like to see a few more photos from that day, take a look at my 500px account HERE.

As usual, if you steal my photos and use them somewhere, I will find out and I will kill you.
For all enquiries and for tips on how not to be killed, drop me a line here: brokenglasseye@hotmail.com

Tell me that I sent ya!

You May Also Be Interested In…
* Photography: The Tennents Brewery, Glasgow. 08/04/2014.
* Glasgow Cathedral At Sunset From My Window.
* Book Cover Photograph: “The Red Road” By Denise Mina.

 

 

Glasgow Necropolis. June, 2013.

I recently lost my camera and I’m pretty sure that it’s gone forever.
The last photos I took with it were of Glasgow Necropolis and luckily, I copied them onto my computer before I lost my camera.

You’ll have to excuse the ‘Selfie’ and you can click on the images to enlarge them.

Here is Glasgow’s Necropolis on a scorching day in June, 2013.
Amazingly, a lot of people (Glaswegians included) don’t even know that this place exists…

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For all photographic enquires, you can email me here: brokenglasseye@hotmail.com
Just ask for ‘Al’ and tell him that I sent you.

You May Also Be Interested in…
* Al Cook’s “Necropolis”
* The Victorian Statues In Glasgow’s George Square
* Glasgow Orange Order Band: “I Lost My Heart To A Starship Trooper”

The Victorian Statues In Glasgow’s George Square.

Regarding the moving of the Victorian statues from Glasgow’s George Square

In THIS article, Herald columnist Catriona Stewart writes:
“For those shedding molten copper tears over their loss: name them.”

We don’t have to name them Catriona in the same way that we don’t have to know the names on every tombstone in the City’s Victorian graveyards or the names of the architects who designed each building.
BECAUSE IF THEY’RE LEFT WHERE THEY ARE WE CAN GO AND LOOK AT THEM WHENEVER WE FLAMING WELL PLEASE CAN’T WE!?

…But since you asked,
Rabbie Burns, Sir Walter Scott, James Watt, Robert Peel, Wullie Gladstone, Queen Victoria, Jimmy Oswald, Lord Clyde, Thomas Graham, Prince Albert, Tam Campbell, John Moore, some soldiers and those big Lions.

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You May Also Be Interested In…
* Glasgow’s George Square Is OUR Rectangle!
* Photos From The “World War Z” Glasgow Set
* Glasgow Cathedral At Sunset From My Window

Glasgow’s George Square Is OUR Rectangle!

The six new shortlisted designs for the revamp of Glasgow’s George Square have been unveiled and I’m almost speechless at how terrible and charmless they all are. ALL of them.

Luckily, I’m not completely speechless and I’d just like to take this opportunity to say this:

George Square Is OUR Rectangle! Leave those Victorian statues EXACTLY where they are!

The moving of Glasgow’s many Victorian statues like gigantic chess pieces is nothing new and it’s not that I or the many other people who live close to the square are against change. As a matter of fact, everybody I’ve personally spoken to is all for a revitalisation of George Square but, and listen carefully, as a PUBLIC and VERY GREEN space!

The statues that surround George Square have been discreetly moved over the years more than once but c’mon! They look so settled where they stand today. And everybody knows it except for the people in charge who very shortly are about to completely ruin George Square as we have come to know it.

Let’s take a look at the six new shortlisted designs for the Square and as always, click on the images to enlarge them.

Design One:

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Design Two:

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Design Three:

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Design Four:

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Design Five:

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Design Six:

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Design Six is apparently the current “most popular” design with Glaswegians. The best of a bad bunch I’d say.

I’m not very good expressing myself when I’m angry without using extreme profanities so here are some photos of how George Square has looked in the past…

1878:

George Square

1880:

G. Square

1929:

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1975:

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Fireworks Night 2012:

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…and here are two panoramic shots of how George Square currently looks today…

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Don’t tell me what you think.
Write to Glasgow City Council and/or a decent Glasgow Newspaper you trust.
So not The Daily Record.

Keep right up to date with everything by visiting: Restore George Square.

You May Also Be Interested In…
* Future Glasgow
* The Glasgow Alphabet By Rosemary Cunningham
* Al Cook’s “Necropolis”

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